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Wednesday, 09 January 2013 15:56

3 Ways to Love Your Job in 2013

After the ball has dropped and the confetti has landed, we've come to the realization that holiday season is over and it's time to get back to work. If one of your resolutions for 2013 was to enjoy your job a little more, you must ask yourself: What do I want to achieve this year? Where do I want my career to go? Check out these 3 ways to love your job in 2013. Have a long-term vision and a short-term plan. Use your time at the job to figure out exactly what kind of job you want next. When you've done that, create a plan on how to get there. Find a mentor, create your professional brand, widen your networks and take career development courses. While creating a plan may not be the easiest task, you're a lot more likely to find your way to a better job or to even enjoy your current job a little more than if you have not plan at all. Find significance in what you do. Take some time to really reflect on what you do for a living. Do you have a meaningful job? Are you doing something fulfilling? Many people bounce…
Tuesday, 08 January 2013 15:24

5 Tax Changes That Take Effect in 2013

There were several significant provisions that went into effect as a result of the healthcare law January 1, 2013 that will impact your paycheck and your estate planning. 1. 3.8% Surtax on Investment Income: This new tax will be applied to your investment income if your adjusted gross income is more than $250,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly and $200,000 for single taxpayers. Investment income includes but is not limited to, interest, dividends, rents,royalties and gain on from the sale of a second home. The surtax also applies to trusts and estates if the income is more than $12,000 and is not paid out to beneficiaries. 2. Medical Device Manufacturing Tax: This tax of 2.3% will be applied to the gross sales of medical device makers, think companies that manufacture pacemakers, vital sign monitoring equipment, etc. There is a small exception for eyeglasses, contact lenses, hearing aids and devices deemed to be purchased by the public at retail for individual use. This tax may only be levied on manufacturers, but is sure to passed along to the consumer. 3. Medicare Payroll Tax Increase: The Medicare tax will increase .9 percent from 1.45 percent to 2.35 percent on wages above $250,000…
Friday, 04 January 2013 15:44

How to Negotiate Your Salary

Want to get an edge on negotiating a raise at work? You probably know you should prepare for the conversation, but what's the best way to do that? Here are six surprising facts about negotiation that will help you walk out of your boss's office with a raise in hand: 1. You actually have to askNegotiation is a conversation. But your manager is probably perfectly happy with things as they are, so to start that conversation, you have to ask. Leaving things as they are saves your manager time and money, and she doesn't have many incentives to give you what you may deserve or even initiate a discussion with you about what you want and need. You are the only person who's motivated to change the status quo, so if you don't ask for a change, it won't happen. 2. Not asking means leaving real money on the tableWe often don't appreciate how much we might be leaving on the table over time by not asking or not asking for enough. To illustrate this, consider the case of two 30-year-old candidates who are offered the same salary. Susy negotiates for $6,000 more, and Grace takes the original salary offer.…
Thursday, 03 January 2013 18:54

Top Money Resolutions for 2013

So losing weight/getting fit will probably never, ever lose its number one spot on annual resolutions lists, but the dire financial straits of the millions of Americans impacted by the economy has caused a new one to creep up to a higher spot on the list. Spend less and save more ranks as the number three resolution for Americans as the country heads into 2013, according to the Journal of Clinical Psychology. Fidelity Investments seconds that emotion because its research found that 47 percent of Americans are making this a top priority in the new year. The real resolution should be to get and remain healthy because studies have shown that financial concerns increase stress, which affects overall health. In case a refresher is needed on basic financial health, here are some things to keep in mind: 1. Get Thee A Budget: If you don't have one, it's time to get one. Take stock of what you spend and what you spend it on. Don't judge yourself, be kind and real with yourself. If you like to imbibe regularly or if shoes is your thing and that's where your money is going, look at how much and then plan accordingly.…
Friday, 28 December 2012 07:46

Turn a ‘No’ Into a ‘Yes’

As a result of rapid technology, young professionals have a plethora of methods they can utilize to communicate with others. They have e-mail, instant messenger, social media (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.), and other applications they use that are internal to their industry or workplace environment. On many occasions, young careerists teach their older colleagues how to make use of these various communication tools. While these applications are cool, fun, quick, and trendy, there's no replacement for old-fashioned, basic interpersonal skills. In these days of shorthand articulation (ie. LOL, LMBO, BRB, HRU, #TBT, #TMI) it's rather easy for one to dismiss the significance of fundamental communication skills. This topic is so important to me that I interviewed one the communication industry's young leaders, Lawrence Watkins, to glean some quick tips on how you can become a better communicator, practically overnight. Watkins is founder of the Great Black Speakers Bureau (GBS), with one of the goals of his agency being to "assist African-American speakers with the opportunity to increase their exposure by offering services to help them advance, promote, and manage their speaking career to achieve future success." Many GBS speakers are celebrities including actress Wendy Raquel Robinson, actor Hill Harper (actor),…
Thursday, 27 December 2012 06:41

5 Success Tips from a Young Millionaire

As I travel around the country as an author and high achievement expert, I've discovered that many students and young professionals fail to fully realize their dreams because of fear. Some of the top fears are: -Fear of the unknown-Fear of rejection-Fear of embarrassment-Fear of success and the expectations that come with it... and the No. 1 fear is "the fear of failure" I interviewed a young professional who has attained the type of success that a lot of young people dream about pursuing in 2013, but they're afraid. Twenty-eight-year-old Farrah Gray was raised on Chicago's impoverished South Side, and by age 14, was one of the youngest teens to become a self-made millionaire in the United States. As a result of his amazing business and philanthropic successes, he's been featured by Oprah Winfrey, BET, CNN, Good Morning America, USA Today, as well as the Tom Joyner Morning Show and Michael Baisden Show—to name a few. Here are tips that he wanted to share with BlackEnterprise.com readers on how to overcome the fear of failure: Depersonalize failure and rejection: Don't view yourself as a failure. Failure and rejection are just somebody else's opinions of you. Embrace the concept of failure…
Wednesday, 26 December 2012 15:43

From Seasonal To Permanent

As the holiday season comes to an end, so will seasonal jobs. But if you find yourself falling in love with your seasonal job and want to turn it into a long-term position, you may face some competition. Many companies only keep on around 10% of their seasonal employees after January. Those are tough, but not impossible, odds. If you would like to turn your seasonal job into permanent paychecks for 2013, check out these four tips on how to keep your temporary job after the holiday season is over. Treat the seasonal job as an audition. Be on time, every time. Managers want to know that they can rely on you to be there when needed. Showing up five minutes early speaks volumes to your preparedness and willingness to work. Along with being punctual, don't forget to be a team player and dress professionally, because you are being watched. Be flexible. If you can cover shifts or even trade so that the company has adequate coverage, this will make you stand out against others. Shift flexibility is important to managers, so if you're asked to come in early, stay late, or even pick up a shift on your day…
Monday, 24 December 2012 17:57

3 Simple Steps for Wealth Building

3 Simple Wealth Building You May Be Overlooking The naked truth is that most women need to create additional income streams to rebuild their wealth. The answer to financial freedom for life doesn't lie in earning 8% or even 10% annually on a traditional retirement account unless that retirement account is into the millions; this varies, of course, depending on age and lifestyle. Sure, it's super important to understand any investment that you make, but what I am seeing from working with women who are struggling to put aside money to grow every month is that increasing income provides the means to accomplish wealth building. Over the past year or two I've been working more with women to help them increase their income using their skills based on the knowledge I've gained from the two companies I run. I absolutely love this work and the clients I serve, so I want to expand my website to reflect this service more clearly. I asked my trusted SEO consultant for his expert advice. He said that he can't see any way that being an income or business strategist relates to index investing or working with a financial advisor, which was my original…
Friday, 21 December 2012 16:38

Avoid A Terrible Tax Fate

Celebrities tax trouble seem like a never ending saga with some having their bank accounts seized by the Internal Revenue Service like troubled child star Lindsay Lohan or Wesley Snipes. There are ways to avoid liens and orange jump suits though, and it all boils down to being organized and handling your business accordingly. Don't Ignore The Letters: If after filing your taxes you see that you owe and you don't have the means to pay immediately, make arrangements. Tax situations don't just occur. They happen over time. Call the IRS as they have installment agreements and extensions available. Try Fresh Start: Having a rough financial year? The IRS has a program called fresh start which got fresh legs when the recession hit to help those who are struggling to keep it together. Underemployed folks with large tax bills could get extra-penalty free time for what they owe. It also offers more flexibility for payment plans. Take Another Look: Like any government agency, the IRS does make mistakes. So, make sure you take a look at your returns to ensure that the math is correct, that they have your correct information, etc. Don't take the agency's word for it, review…
Thursday, 20 December 2012 08:35

Avoid Holiday Shopping Mistakes

The holiday season is full of enticing opportunities to spend. Everything looks sparkly and shiny, but the tinsel and the glitter could burn a hole in the wallet. Here are a few shopping traps to resist this holiday season. Chill on the Gift Wrapping: Half of the fun of opening presents is tearing off the pretty decorative paper, ribbons and bows, but these extras can add up. Instead of racking up $100s on gift wrapping paper and bags, save the ones from last year and recycle. It's not a faux pas anymore, and will save you in the long run. Trim the Tree and the Gift List: Hopefully, by now making a list is a given. Impulse shopping will most certainly lead to post-holiday debt. It's important to take a second, even third look at the list before stepping out of the door and see where cuts can be made. If any item on the list is there because the shopper feels guilty, it must go – negative emotions lead to overspending. Shopping Does Not Equal Celebrating: Spending during the holiday season does not necessarily mean that the season is being celebrated. Instead of going crazy in the aisles because…
Wednesday, 19 December 2012 15:55

What You Need to Know About LinkedIn

When it comes to social networking sites, LinkedIn is not viewed as one of the most exciting platforms (thanks to the ability to "pin," "tweet" and "Facebook" nearly any aspect of life), but it is definitely one web-based network you should invest your time in. In fact, there's a bevy of functions that are raising the stakes, allowing professionals to stay connected with others in and outside of their spheres of influence, access applications and remain up to date on the latest career-related news. Mashable outlines five capabilities you should familiarize yourself with and maximize on LinkedIn: Read more: http://www.blackenterprise.com/technology/5-things-you-need-to-know-about-linkedin/
Tuesday, 18 December 2012 15:46

Big Sean’s 5 Money Lessons

It pretty much goes without saying, but Big Sean had a monster year in 2012. Sean released the critically-acclaimed Detroit mixtape, featuring hits like the Key Wane-produced "Higher," and "24 Karats of Gold" with J. Cole. He headlined a homecoming show at the Palace of Auburn Hills, earlier this month. Guap, the first single from the forthcoming album "Hall of Fame, Memoirs of a Detroit Player," debuted at No. 31 on the Billboard R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. If you listened to Detroit, you know that Sean, "made a mil' before 25," and that, for all of his apparent success, Sean's devoted himself to creating opportunities for others around him. He also formed the Sean Anderson Foundation, a non-profit dedicated to encouraging and empowering Detroit's young people. Let's decode his latest single, Guap, which, for the uninitiated, is parlance for money. The song's produced by fellow Detroit native and wunderkind Key Wane. Check out our profile of him here. Onto the mula. Pay yourself first. With all of the giddiness of a schoolboy who just found a bag of money, Sean squeals: "I've been working all ... year, I just got my check. I'm 'bout to spend it all on me, I'm…
Monday, 17 December 2012 17:06

Job Searching While Still Employed

Your current job could be the stepping stone to your dream, but many professionals struggle with how to juggle new career moves while handling what's already on their plate. Here's how you can balance both with ease and confidence: Have lunch with a mentor: Instead of using every lunch break to sit and chat with your coworkers, take the time to meet with your mentor. The power conversation you two have can be just the motivation you need to re-focus your energy and get back in the job-hunting process. Use your breaks wisely: Take time out of your lunch break or morning coffee run to search for more jobs and send out your resume. You will be surprised by how much you get accomplished in those few minutes and before you know it, you'll have a much clearer view of your job options and what you can do to better yourself. Talk to other coworkers about your career goals: Sharing your career goals with other coworkers may have its pros and cons, but you never know who other people know. Telling your closest coworkers about your dream career—not disgruntled laments about the current job—can also put them on the lookout…
Thursday, 13 December 2012 16:23

Working Women Are Now Important

Women are bringing home more income than ever before and even though the economy has improved, families are still depending on it even as the economy improves. Research from The Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire found that married couples are relying on women's income at record levels, with employed wives bringing in 47 percent of their family's total income. "The massive job losses during the 18 months of the Great Recession, primarily in male-dominated industries such as manufacturing and construction, coupled with sluggish job growth during the recovery, have left many families with lower earnings and have placed an unprecedented importance on wives' earnings to keep families afloat," said Kristin Smith, family demographer with The Carsey Institute."The Great Recession, in particular, substantially accelerated the trend of an increased reliance on employed wives' earnings." Based on the data on married couples from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Minnesota Population Center, researchers found that between 2008 and 2009, the contribution to total family earnings from employed married women jumped from 45 percent to 47 percent, the largest single-year increase during the past 23 years. That percentage remained steady in 2010 and 2011. The study also examined previous recessions…